What is Equine Clicker Training or Training with Positive Reinforcement?

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This article gives a brief overview about what is involved with using markers and treats to make it easier for a horse to understand what we would like it to do.

Equine Clicker Training Explained

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HorseGym with Boots video clip series on YouTube

There is a little series of clicker training activities posted on YouTube.  They can be reached by putting HorseGym with Boots into the YouTube search engine, then clicking on the ‘playlist’ of the same name.

Each clip has an accompanying set of notes with lots of planning and thin-slicing ideas.  I am happy to send the notes as a PDF attachment to an email.  They are free on request.  Just email me at:  hertha.james@xtra.co.nz

Or below is the first of the series.

THE PLAN: Thin-Slicing the Tasks We Want to Teach

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What is Thin-Slicing?

When we want to teach our horse something, the first thing we need is a PLAN.  A plan written down has the advantage that we can look back on it.  As we get feedback from the horse and our own actions, we can go back and tweak our original plan.  Or we can throw it out and start again :-).

One way to create a plan is to:

  1. Visualize the finished task.
  2. Brainstorm all the individual specific actions the horse needs to be able to do to complete the whole task.
  3. Put the actions from 2. above into an order that seems logical.  Each specific action will have one or more ‘click points’ where we click&treat.  This allows the horse to pro-actively seek the hot ‘click point’ of the moment and makes training fun for everyone involved.  This is the thin-slicing part.
  4. Decide how we might teach each specific action (by free-shaping, pressure & release, using a nose or foot target, or even modeling for the horse what we would like him to do).  This part of the plan includes thinking about what sort of environmental props would make each part of the task easier for the horse to learn (e.g., rails, markers, barriers, lane-ways, corners).
  5. Experiment with the horse and gain feedback to see what is working and what needs rethinking and tweaking [or starting over with a new idea  🙂 ].
  6. Gradually chain the specific actions together until the horse knows the pattern and willingly carries out the whole task with one ‘click point’ at the end.

The video clip link below is a bit long (9 min) but it demonstrates all the parts of a PLAN and it uses various teaching methods to get to the final successful outcome.

http://youtu.be/ojOaYaq8ItQ?list=UUGMJ0ZTjACQ2Ok8civ_9IVQ